Health

In this Monday, Aug. 13, 2018 photo, Brian Madeux interacts with research nurse Chrishauna Lacy at his home in New River, Ariz. Madeux was the first person in the world to participate in a gene editing attempt in his body, for the inherited disease Hunter syndrome. Early partial results from the study were released on Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018. (AP Photo/Matt York)
September 05, 2018 - 8:58 am
PHOENIX (AP) — Early, partial results from a historic gene editing study give encouraging signs that the treatment may be safe and having at least some of its hoped-for effect, but it's too soon to know whether it ultimately will succeed. The results announced Wednesday are from the first human...
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September 05, 2018 - 6:56 am
NEW YORK (AP) — The once-heralded blood-testing startup Theranos is shutting down, according to a media report. Theranos was unable to sell itself and is now looking to pay unsecured creditors its remaining cash of about $5 million in the upcoming months, according to an email The Wall Street...
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FILE - This Aug. 12, 2014 file photo shows safety helmets in a container in a pre-K classroom at an elementary school in Oklahoma. Comprehensive new children's concussion guidelines from the U.S. government released on Tuesday, Sept. 4, 2018, recommend against routine X-rays and blood tests for diagnosis and reassure parents that most kids' symptoms subside within one to three months. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
September 04, 2018 - 12:22 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — New children's concussion guidelines from the U.S. government recommend against routine X-rays and blood tests for diagnosis and reassure parents that most kids' symptoms clear up within one to three months. Signs of potentially more serious injuries that may warrant CT imaging scans...
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Brian Weekly, a contractor at West Virginia’s Grant Town coal-fired power plant, gestures toward the small facility’s smokestack, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2018 in Grant Town, W.Va. Weekly says opponents of the coal industry are behind warnings of health risks from smokestack emissions under the Trump administration’s plan. President Donald Trump picked West Virginia where he announced rolling back pollution rules for coal-fired power plants. But he didn’t mention that the northern two-thirds of West Virginia, with the neighboring part of Pennsylvania, would be hit hardest. (AP Photo/ Ellen Knickmeyer)
September 03, 2018 - 4:09 pm
GRANT TOWN, W.Va. (AP) — It's coal people like miner Steve Knotts, 62, who make West Virginia Trump Country. So it was no surprise that President Donald Trump picked the state to announce his plan rolling back Obama-era pollution controls on coal-fired power plants. Trump left one thing out of his...
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File - In this Aug. 9, 2018, file photo, firefighters keep watch the Holy Fire burning in the Cleveland National Forest in Lake Elsinore, Calif. Researchers have expanded a health-monitoring study of wildland firefighters after a previous study found season-long health declines and deteriorating reaction times. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu, File)
September 02, 2018 - 6:50 am
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Randy Brooks' son had a request three years ago: What could his dad do to make wildland firefighting safer? To Brooks, a professor at the University of Idaho's College of Natural Resources who deals with wildland firefighting, it was more of a command. His son, Bo Brooks, is a...
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Supreme Court Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor talks about her children's book, "Turning Pages: My Life Story", during the Library of Congress National Book Festival in Washington, Saturday, Sept. 1, 2018. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
September 01, 2018 - 4:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor got some unsolicited health advice the last time she wrote a book. The justice was diagnosed with diabetes as a child and discussed it as part of her 2013 autobiography, "My Beloved World." Sotomayor said Saturday in an interview with The...
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FILE -In this June 12, 2014 file photo, natural gas is burned off near pumps in Watford City, N.D. As Trump rolls back some Obama-era rules on climate-changing methane pollution, Colorado officials say their regulations have reduced oil field leaks. A report released Thursday, Aug. 23, 2018, shows required state inspections helped find and repair 73,000 methane leaks over three years. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)
August 31, 2018 - 10:50 am
DENVER (AP) — The Trump administration is rolling back some U.S. regulations on climate-changing methane pollution, calling them expensive and burdensome, but Colorado says its rules are working — and they have industry support. Energy companies have found and repaired about 73,000 methane leaks...
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August 30, 2018 - 1:44 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The only remaining doctor in Oregon's only heart transplant program has resigned, leaving the state with no medical facilities that can perform the life-saving procedure. The Oregonian/OregonLive reports Thursday that Oregon Health & Science University will transfer the 20...
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FILE - In this Feb. 13, 2018 file photo, a week-old baby lies in a neonatal intensive care unit bay at the Norton Children's Hospital in Louisville, Ky. This particular NICU is dedicated to newborns of opioid addicted mothers, that are suffering with newborn abstinence syndrome. The area is kept dark and quiet due to increased production of neurotransmitters in newborns of addicted mothers, which can disrupt the nervous system and overstimulate bodily functions. A study in Tennessee released on Thursday, Aug 30, 2018, found learning disabilities and other special education needs are more common in young children who were born with symptoms from their mothers' prenatal opioid use. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)
August 30, 2018 - 6:52 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Learning disabilities and other special education needs are common in children born with opioid-related symptoms from their mother's drug use while pregnant, according to the first big U.S. study to examine potential long-term problems in these infants. About 1 in 7 affected children...
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August 29, 2018 - 5:15 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A patient with a history of violence was charged with assault Tuesday after he punched a nurse, knocked her to the floor and repeatedly stomped on her head at a Washington state psychiatric hospital that recently lost accreditation and federal funding due to safety violations. Staff...
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