Earth science

A resident inspects a mosque damaged by an earthquake in North Lombok, Indonesia, Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018. Thousands left homeless by the powerful quake that ruptured roads and flattened buildings on the Indonesian tourist island of Lombok sheltered Monday night in makeshift tents as authorities said rescuers hadn't yet reached all devastated areas. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
August 06, 2018 - 10:19 pm
MATARAM, Indonesia (AP) — The Latest on an earthquake that struck Indonesia's Lombok island (all times local): 9:00 a.m. Soldiers have pulled a man alive from the rubble of a large mosque that collapsed in northern Lombok during Sunday night's powerful earthquake. Video shot by a soldier on Monday...
Read More
An elderly man rests in a makeshift hospital after surviving a major earthquake in Kayangan on Lombok Island, Indonesia, Monday, Aug. 6, 2018. Indonesian authorities said Monday that rescuers still haven't reached some devastated parts of the tourist island of Lombok after the powerful earthquake flattened houses and toppled bridges, killing large number of people and shaking neighboring Bali. (AP Photo/Fauzy Chaniago)
August 06, 2018 - 6:33 am
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — The Latest on an earthquake that struck Indonesia's Lombok island (all times local): 5:10 p.m. National Disaster Mitigation Agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho says the death toll from the Lombok earthquake has risen to 98 from the previously announced 91. Officials have...
Read More
This May 3, 2018 photo provided by Benjamin Bond-Lamberty shows a device measuring the amount of carbon dioxide released into the air from the soil at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center near Edgewater, Md. Observations from across the globe show that as temperatures have warmed, bacteria and fungi in the soil are becoming more active. These turbo-charged microbes are feeding on dead leaves and plants, releasing more heat-trapping carbon dioxide into the air, according to a study in the Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2018 edition of the journal Nature. (Benjamin Bond-Lamberty via AP)
August 01, 2018 - 1:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Even the dirt on the ground is making climate change worse, a new study finds. Plants capture massive amounts of carbon, pumping it into the soil where usually it stays for hundreds or thousands of years. Observations from across the globe show that as temperatures have warmed,...
Read More
Villagers walk near destroyed homes in an area affected by the early morning earthquake at Sajang village, Sembalun, East Lombok, Indonesia, Sunday, July 29, 2018. A shallow, magnitude 6.4 earthquake early Sunday killed at least 10 people and injured 40 on Indonesia's Lombok Island, a popular tourist destination next to Bali, officials said. (AP Photo/ Rosidin)
July 29, 2018 - 6:28 am
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — A strong and shallow earthquake early Sunday killed at least 14 people and injured more than 160 on Indonesia's Lombok island, a popular tourist destination next to Bali, officials said. The quake damaged more than 1,000 houses and was felt in a wider area, including on...
Read More
An historic schoolhouse burns as the Carr Fire tears through Shasta, Calif., Thursday, July 26, 2018. Fueled by high temperatures, wind and low humidity, the blaze destroyed multiple homes and at least one historic building. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)
July 28, 2018 - 1:04 am
Heat waves are setting all-time temperature records across the globe, again. Europe suffered its deadliest fire in more than a century, and one of nearly 90 large fires in the U.S. West burned dozens of homes and forced the evacuation of at least 37,000 people near Redding, California. Flood-...
Read More
Traffic queue for the Eurotunnel in Folkestone, south east England, Friday July 27, 2018. Britain sweltered through the hottest day of the year Thursday, as an unusual heatwave wreaked havoc on transport and hospitals. The Cross-Channel rail operator cancelled thousands of tickets after "extreme temperatures" caused major disruption to services. (Gareth Fuller/PA via AP)
July 27, 2018 - 11:07 am
BERLIN (AP) — Researchers say heatwaves of the kind currently being seen in northern Europe have become twice as likely due to climate change. Scientists from the World Weather Attribution team said Friday they have compared observations and forecasts for the Netherlands, Denmark and Ireland with...
Read More
In this Monday, July 23, 2018 photo, heat ripples blur the downtown skyline as a jet lands in Phoenix, Ariz., as temperatures exceed 100 degrees in the morning hours. Already devilishly hot for being in the Sonoran desert, Arizona’s largest city is also an “urban heat island,” a phenomenon that pushes up temperatures in areas covered in heat-retaining asphalt and concrete. Phoenix officials say they are tackling urban warming, monitoring downtown temperatures, planting thousands of trees and capturing rainwater to cool off public spaces. (AP Photo/Matt York)
July 26, 2018 - 2:00 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — When temperatures soar as they have this week in downtown Phoenix, homeless people ride the air-conditioned light rail to avoid a heat so brutal it killed 155 people in the city and surrounding areas last year. An occasional siren wails as paramedics rush to help people sick from the...
Read More

Pages