Legal proceedings

FILE - In this July 30, 2013, file photo, people walk along a corridor at the headquarters of Johnson & Johnson in New Brunswick, N.J. A Philadelphia jury has ruled that Johnson & Johnson and Janssen Pharmaceuticals must pay $8 billion in punitive damages over an antipsychotic drug linked to the abnormal growth of female breast tissue in boys. A law firm for the plaintiff released a statement Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, saying the companies used an organized scheme to make billions of dollars while illegally marketing and promoting the drug called Risperdal. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)
October 08, 2019 - 8:27 pm
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A Philadelphia jury on Tuesday awarded $8 billion in punitive damages against Johnson & Johnson and one if its subsidiaries over a drug the companies made that the plaintiff's attorneys say is linked to the abnormal growth of female breast tissue in boys. Johnson and Johnson...
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Gregory Abbott, far left, and his wife Marcia, far right, get into a car as they leave federal court after their sentencing in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, in Boston. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
October 08, 2019 - 6:05 pm
BOSTON (AP) — A business executive and his wife, a former journalist, were each sentenced to a month in prison Tuesday for paying $125,000 to rig their daughter's college entrance exams in a scandal involving dozens of wealthy and sometimes famous parents. Gregory and Marcia Abbott, of New York and...
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FILE - In this Dec. 20, 2016 file photo, Ahmad Khan Rahimi, the man accused of setting off bombs in New Jersey and New York's Chelsea neighborhood, sits in court in Elizabeth, N.J. Rahimi, an Islamic terrorist already serving a life prison term for a bombing in New York City, was convicted Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, of multiple counts of attempted murder and assault stemming from a shootout with police three years ago in New Jersey. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)
October 08, 2019 - 5:28 pm
ELIZABETH, N.J. (AP) — An Islamic terrorist already serving a life prison term for a bombing in New York City was convicted Tuesday of multiple counts of attempted murder and assault stemming from a shootout with police three years ago. Ahmad Khan Rahimi , a U.S. citizen who was born in Afghanistan...
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FILE - In this June 24, 2019, file photo, a CSX freight train rolls past downtown Pittsburgh. The biggest U.S. freight railroads appear ready to renew their push to reduce their crews to one-person from the current two-man operation used at major railroads now. Eight U.S. railroads have filed a federal lawsuit against the union that represents rail conductors to force the SMART union to negotiate about crew sizes during the next round of contract talks that starts in November. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)
October 08, 2019 - 4:35 pm
OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — The biggest U.S. freight railroads appear ready to renew their push to reduce their crews to one person from the current two-man operation used at major railroads now. Eight U.S. railroads have filed a federal lawsuit against the union that represents rail conductors to force the...
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FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2019, file photo, cars pass Purdue Pharma headquarters in Stamford, Conn. Local government lawsuits against the family that owns Purdue Pharma should be allowed to proceed even as the company attempts to reach a nationwide settlement in bankruptcy court over the toll of the opioids crisis, according to a court filing on Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)
October 08, 2019 - 4:19 pm
Arizona's attorney general is having misgivings about agreeing to Purdue Pharma's proposal to settle litigation over the opioid crisis. Attorney General Mark Brnovich, a Republican, said in a court filing late Monday that the OxyContin maker has "sought to undermine material terms of the deal." He...
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LGBT supporters gather in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, in Washington. The Supreme Court is set to hear arguments in its first cases on LGBT rights since the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy. Kennedy was a voice for gay rights while his successor, Brett Kavanaugh, is regarded as more conservative. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
October 08, 2019 - 12:26 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Tuesday heard highly anticipated cases on whether federal civil rights law should apply to LGBT people, with Chief Justice John Roberts questioning how doing so would affect employers. In the first of two cases, the justices heard arguments on whether a...
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In a photo taken June 21, 2019, Alyse Sanchez and her husband, Elmer Sanchez, pose for The Associated Press in Sandy Spring, Md. The Sanchezes and five other couples have filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Maryland arguing U.S. immigration authorities are luring couples to marriage interviews only to detain the immigrant spouses. (AP Photo/Regina Garcia Cano)
October 08, 2019 - 7:44 am
BALTIMORE (AP) — Alyse and Elmer Sanchez were thrilled when they survived their "green card" interview, a crucial step in obtaining lawful status in the United States. She texted her family from the immigration office as relief washed over her: The officer had agreed that their marriage is...
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Leslie Begay, left, speaks with U.S. Rep. Deb Haaland, D-New Mexico, in a hallway outside a congressional field hearing in Albuquerque, N.M., highlighting the atomic age's impact on Native American communities on Monday, Oct. 7, 2019. Begay, a former uranium miner on the Navajo Nation with lung problems, says there are lingering injustices and health problems on his reservation decades after mines closed. An Indian Health Service official cited federal research at the hearing that she says showed some Navajo women, males and babies who were part of the study had high levels of uranium in their systems. (AP Photo/Mary Hudetz)
October 07, 2019 - 10:30 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — About a quarter of Navajo women and some infants who were part of a federally funded study on uranium exposure had high levels of the radioactive metal in their systems, decades after mining for Cold War weaponry ended on their reservation, a U.S. health official Monday...
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FILE - In this Monday, Nov. 26, 2018 file photo, Samuel Little, who often went by the name Samuel McDowell, leaves the Ector County Courthouse after attending a pre-trial hearing in Odessa, Texas. The Federal Bureau of Investigation says Little, who claims to have killed more than 90 women across the country, is the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history. In a news release on Sunday, Oct. 6, 2019 the FBI said Samuel Little confessed to 93 murders. Federal crime analysts believe all of his confessions are credible, and officials have been able to verify 50 confessions so far. (Mark Rogers/Odessa American via AP, File)
October 07, 2019 - 7:20 pm
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — The inmate who claims to have killed more than 90 women across the country is now considered to be the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history, the Federal Bureau of Investigation said. Samuel Little, who has been behind bars since 2012, told investigators last year...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, May 8, 2019 file photo, workers stand near a Boeing 737 MAX 8 jetliner being built for American Airlines prior to a test flight in Renton, Wash. The union representing Southwest Airlines pilots is suing Boeing and calling the grounded 737 Max unsafe. The Southwest Airlines Pilots Association said on Monday, Oct. 7, 2019 it filed a lawsuit against Boeing that Boeing rushed the plane into service and misled pilots by saying it was little different than previous versions of the 737. The union says those claims turned out to be false. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
October 07, 2019 - 7:05 pm
DALLAS (AP) — The union representing Southwest Airlines pilots is suing Boeing, saying its pilots are losing money because the company rushed an unsafe plane into service only to have the 737 Max grounded after two deadly crashes. The Southwest Airlines Pilots Association said in the lawsuit filed...
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