State courts

July 03, 2019 - 10:15 am
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Gov. Kim Reynolds is transforming the Iowa Supreme Court from one that leaned left to a solidly conservative body, prompting concerns that it could erode past rulings on social issues. Reynolds already has made two appointments to the seven-member court, which now has a 5-2...
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In this Aug. 13, 2001, file frame from video provided by C-SPAN, Tom Hofeller speaks during an event at the Republican National Committee in Washington. Hofeller, a mastermind of GOP redistricting preached keeping electronic records secure. But after his death in 2018, his own files found their way to the heart of lawsuits over a U.S. census question on citizenship and North Carolina’s legislative redistricting. (C-SPAN via AP)
July 02, 2019 - 6:31 pm
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Documents recovered from the house of a deceased Republican mapmaker that are part of a partisan gerrymandering lawsuit in North Carolina shouldn't be used in this month's scheduled trial because there's no way to authenticate them, GOP lawyers said Tuesday. The files linked to...
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June 28, 2019 - 1:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court will consider reviving a Montana program that gives tax credits to people who donate to private-school scholarships. The state's highest court had struck down the program because it violated the Montana constitution's ban on state aid to religious organizations...
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June 28, 2019 - 9:45 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A legal challenge to a cross that stands in a public park in Florida is getting another look. The Supreme Court on Friday told a lower court to review decisions that the cross should be removed and take into account an opinion the court issued last week in a case involving a cross...
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FILE - In this April 1, 2019, file photo, Mindy Nagel poses for a photograph at the threshold of her home in Cincinnati. Nagel's home is split by two House districts. The Supreme Court said, by a 5-4 vote on Thursday, June 27, 2019, that claims of partisan gerrymandering do not belong in federal court. The court's conservative, Republican-appointed majority says that voters and elected officials should be the arbiters of what is a political dispute The decision effectively reverses the outcome of rulings in Maryland, Michigan, North Carolina and Ohio, where courts had ordered new maps drawn. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
June 28, 2019 - 12:09 am
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — The battle for political advantage in state capitols is poised to become more intense after the U.S. Supreme Court decision declaring that federal judges have no role in settling disputes over partisan gerrymandering. Thursday's ruling could empower Republicans and...
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FILE - In this Nov. 10, 2015, file photo, Frazier Glenn Miller Jr., convicted of capital murder, attempted murder and other charges, gestures as Johnson County deputies remove Miller from the courtroom during the sentencing phase of his trial at the Johnson County District Court in Olathe, Kan. A recent Kansas Supreme Court ruling declaring that the state constitution protects access to abortion has opened the door to a new legal attack on the death penalty. Attorneys for five of the 10 men on death row in Kansas, including Miller Jr., argue that the abortion decision means the state's courts can enforce the broad guarantees of "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness" in the Bill of Rights in the Kansas Constitution. (Joe Ledford/The Kansas City Star via AP, Pool, File)
June 26, 2019 - 11:12 am
TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — A recent Kansas Supreme Court ruling declaring that the state constitution protects access to abortion opened the door to a new legal attack on the death penalty. Attorneys for five of the 10 men on death row in Kansas argue that the abortion decision means the state's courts...
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Grammy-winning rapper Cardi B, right, waves at fans as she arrives for a hearing at Queens County Criminal Court, Tuesday, June 25, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
June 25, 2019 - 7:23 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Grammy-winning rapper Cardi B was arraigned Tuesday on new felony charges in connection with a fight last year at a New York City strip club. "Not guilty, sir, honor," said the rapper dressed in a dark blue and light pink pantsuit with her hair tinted blue as she pleaded in state...
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FILE - In this June 14, 2010 file photograph, Clemmie Flemming points out to prosecutor Doug Evans, center, where she spotted Curtis Giovanni Flowers on the morning of four slayings at Tardy Furniture in Greenwood, Miss. Evans, a Mississippi prosecutor who has tried the same man six times in a death penalty case now will decide whether to seek a seventh trial after the U.S. Supreme Court found racial bias in jury selection. (Taylor Kuykendall/The Commonwealth via AP, File)
June 22, 2019 - 9:44 am
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A Mississippi prosecutor has tried and failed six times to send Curtis Flowers to the death chamber, with the latest trial conviction and death sentence overturned on Friday because of racial bias in jury selection. Now, that same prosecutor must decide whether to try Flowers...
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FILE - In this March 20, 2019 file photo, Attorney Sheri Johnson leaves the Supreme Court after challenging a Mississippi prosecutor's decision to keep African-Americans off the jury in the trial of Curtis Flowers, in Washington. The Supreme Court is throwing out the murder conviction and death sentence for Flowers because of a prosecutor's efforts to keep African Americans off the jury. The defendant already has been tried six times and now could face a seventh trial. The court's 7-2 decision Friday says the removal of black prospective jurors violated the rights of inmate Curtis Flowers. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
June 22, 2019 - 2:27 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Friday threw out the murder conviction and death sentence for a black man in Mississippi because of a prosecutor's efforts to keep African Americans off the jury. The defendant already has been tried six times and now could face a seventh trial. The removal of...
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FILE - In this Sept. 21, 2018 file photo, Pennsylvania resident Rose Mary Knick stands next to a private property sign on her farmland in Lackawanna County's Scott Township. The Supreme Court is siding with Knick in a case that gives citizens another avenue to pursue claims when they believe states and local governments have harmed their property rights. The high court ruled Friday in the case. (AP Photo/Jessica Gresko)
June 21, 2019 - 3:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled Friday to allow people to sue in federal court when they believe states and local governments have harmed their property rights, handing a victory to a Pennsylvania woman fighting her town over a cemetery ordinance. The high court ruled 5-4 along...
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