State courts

March 20, 2019 - 12:58 pm
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri regulators reversed course Wednesday and gave the go-ahead to one of the nation's largest renewable energy projects — a high-voltage power line delivering wind energy from the Midwest to a power grid for eastern states. The proposed Grain Belt Express...
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FILE - In this Oct., 2018 file photo, Chicago police Officer Jason Van Dyke watches the prosecution's closing statements during his first degree murder trial for the shooting death of Laquan McDonald at the Leighton Criminal Court Building in Chicago. The Illinois Supreme Court has let stand a less than seven year prison sentence for a white Chicago police officer convicted of killing black teenager Laquan McDonald that some critics characterized as a slap on the wrist. A Tuesday, March 19, 2019 decision denies a bid by Illinois attorney general Kwame Raoul and a special prosecutor to re-sentence Jason Van Dyke. The February request focused on highly legalistic issues surrounding sentencing guidelines. (Antonio Perez/Chicago Tribune via AP, Pool, File)
March 19, 2019 - 12:38 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — The Illinois Supreme Court on Tuesday said it would let stand a less than seven year prison sentence for a white Chicago police officer convicted of killing black teenager Laquan McDonald that many criticized as far too lenient. The decision denies a rare bid by the Illinois attorney...
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This Aug. 3, 2017 photo provided by Mississippi Department of Corrections shows Curtis Flowers, who's murder case has gone to trial six times. Supreme Court justices are again considering how to keep prosecutors from removing African-Americans from criminal juries for racially biased reasons, this time in a case involving a Mississippi death row inmate who has been tried six times for murder. (Mississippi Department of Corrections via AP)
March 19, 2019 - 12:36 pm
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A black Mississippi man who has been tried six times for murder says his latest conviction and death sentence should be thrown out for a familiar reason — the prosecutor's practice of keeping African-Americans off the jury. Curtis Flowers has been jailed in Mississippi for 22...
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March 18, 2019 - 9:42 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is rejecting an appeal from a Hawaii bed and breakfast that wouldn't rent a room to a lesbian couple. The justices on Monday are leaving in place Hawaiian state court rulings that found the Aloha Bed & Breakfast in Honolulu violated Hawaii's anti-...
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Police Officers stand in front of the court entrance prior the beginning of the trial against Alaa S. of Syria in the higher regional court in Dresden, Germany, Monday, March 18, 2019. The asylum seeker is accused together with now fugitive Iraqi asylum-seeker of having killed 35-year-old Daniel H. in Chemnitz on Aug. 26, 2019. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)
March 18, 2019 - 7:50 am
BERLIN (AP) — A Syrian asylum-seeker went on trial Monday in eastern Germany over the fatal stabbing in August of a German man that touched off far-right protests in the city of Chemnitz. Alaa S., whose last name wasn't given in line with German privacy laws, faces charges of manslaughter for the...
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FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2013, file photo, firearms training unit Detective Barbara J. Mattson, of the Connecticut State Police, holds a Bushmaster AR-15 rifle, the same make and model used by Adam Lanza in the 2012 Sandy Hook School shooting, during a hearing at the Legislative Office Building in Hartford, Conn. A divided Connecticut Supreme Court ruled, Thursday, March 14, 2019, gun maker Remington can be sued over how it marketed the Bushmaster rifle used in the massacre. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
March 14, 2019 - 4:43 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Gun-maker Remington can be sued over how it marketed the rifle used to kill 20 children and six educators at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012, a divided Connecticut Supreme Court ruled Thursday. Gun control advocates touted the ruling as providing a possible roadmap for...
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Flanked by lawmakers, Gov. Gavin Newsom discusses his decision to place a moratorium on the death penalty during a news conference at the Capitol, March 13, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
March 13, 2019 - 8:20 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Gov. Gavin Newsom not only put a moratorium on executions in California on Wednesday, he said he also may commute death sentences and is pushing to repeal capital punishment. Newsom signed an executive order granting reprieves to all 737 condemned inmates on the nation's...
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Brett Busby, appointed by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott to fill a vacancy on the Texas Supreme Court, attends his Senate confirmation hearing Thursday, March 7, 2019, in Austin, Texas. Barely three months after Texas Democrats showed signs of cracking Republican dominance in Texas elections, Abbott is using the power of his office to stem that tide by appointing Republican judges who had been rejected by voters to new positions on the bench. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
March 07, 2019 - 3:27 pm
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Gov. Greg Abbott has quietly been stocking Texas courts with Republican judges freshly rejected by voters, employing one of the strongest powers of his office to stem the erosion of the GOP's decades-long dominance in the state. In the three months since the worst election...
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FILE - In this Feb 14, 2019 file photo, Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly ponders a question during a news conference at the Statehouse in Topeka, Kan. Kansas lawmakers have hit the halfway point of their annual session and the GOP-dominated Legislature doesn't just appear to be slow-walking new Democratic Gov. Laura Kelly's big initiatives. Despite Republican supermajorities, an income tax relief bill that GOP leaders consider an urgent priority hasn't cleared both chambers. (AP Photo/John Hanna, File)
March 06, 2019 - 12:32 pm
TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Kansas' new Democratic governor is meeting unexpected resistance to her plan for boosting public education funding from local school districts that believe her proposal wouldn't supply enough new money. Gov. Laura Kelly touts her proposed increase of roughly $90 million a year...
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This undated photo provided by the U.S. Military Academy at West Point shows West Point Cadet Peter Zhu who died on Feb. 28, 2019 of injuries he sustained while skiing on Feb. 23 at Victor Constant Ski Area on the academy grounds. The parents of Peter Zhu have received a judge's permission to retrieve his sperm for possible artificial insemination. (U.S. Military Academy at West Point via AP)
March 04, 2019 - 10:14 pm
WEST POINT, N.Y. (AP) — The parents of a 21-year-old West Point cadet fatally injured in a skiing accident raced the clock to get a judge's permission to retrieve his sperm for "the possibility of preserving some piece of our child that might live on." U.S. Military Academy Cadet Peter Zhu was...
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